Common Problems to Avoid With a Catering Function?

A Catering business is like any other business, in that like every other business there has to be a small percentage for error. Even though it seems like caterers perform miracles, they are not, in fact, miracle workers. And just as your electricity goes off sometimes, or you don’t get very good cell phone reception in certain areas or the supermarket is out of your favourite food item; catering companies can encounter problems if you do not follow all of the correct steps, albeit a small percentage of that happening.

The chances are that your catering company encountered ten or more problems during the last function that you attended, but they were both manageable and small enough, plus the catering company were professional enough that it did not show on the outside.

There is an old saying which says “a caterer is like a duck, smooth and graceful on the surface, but paddling like crazy underneath“.

In this article there are four of the most important pieces of information which you should be asked to provide which would help in the eventuality that something might crop up that your catering company doesn’t know about.

1. You should give your caterer at least three different contact numbers.

If it is six or twelve months out from your wedding and you have locked in a caterer and contracts have been signed, it is difficult to see ahead and to know exactly what is going to happen on the day. If something happens, for example; the chef gets lost or involved in a traffic accident, the caterer will need to be able to contact someone. They will not want to be phoning the bride, groom during the service and add a memory that should not be there.

2. Is there parking available on-site?

This sounds like an obvious one, but it is so obvious that it easily gets missed. Also, a party at a private residence for thirty or more guests, plus a band, plus other entertainment can easily fill the parking spaces up fast. If possible try to save your catering company and other professionals at your event, a parking space nearby, even it is just for loading and unloading only.

3. Are there amenities on-site?

A caterer is bound by certain health and safety laws, such as having running water to wash their hands and many others. The local caterers in your jurisdiction will also be bound by similar laws and regulations. If the catering site is remote then your caterer would need to know if there is electricity, running water, toilets, shelter from the elements and more. All of these potential problems are easily dealt with if your caterer is notified beforehand.

4. Final numbers and late RSVP.

Final numbers and late comers are not a problem, as long as the caterer is made aware of it. A simple phone call the day before just to touch base with the caterer is fine. As a procedure, your caterer should include some extra food at no extra cost to the client. This should be in their costings. The amount included extra is dependent on the types of menu and the number of guests. Your caterer should do this for a number of reasons, firstly in case of extra numbers. Secondly they should cater extra food in case of any accidents. As I mentioned before, accidents do happen sometimes and your catering company need to have something up their sleeves. Lastly, if the correct numbers arrive, there are no accidents then you will just be provided with the extra food.

If these simple recommendations can be followed then it could be the difference between a successful catering function and a potential disaster. Let your caterer know as soon as possible when something changes or something you feel might be an issue, it doesn’t matter how small of a deal you think it is.



Source by Noah P Davis

Comparing Three Brands of Chef Knives: Function Form and Style

Though I am not a trained chef, I cook and prepare gourmet meals, spending many hours with a knife in hand. The use of a good knife is highly important in the kitchen. The comfort in hand, sharpness of blade, how long the blade stays sharp, and the balance in the hand are my criteria. These are my opinions only, and may not apply to how they are used by another.

Wusthof Classic 8 inch chef knife

I have had the Wusthof chef knife for 14 years. The first important thing about Wusthof Classic is that the handles are resin, and not wood. I am constantly cutting and chopping and washing the knives, though never in the dishwasher. Wood handles get dry and need oil, just a fact of life. I look for ease. This was a point in favor of Wusthof. Wusthof uses high carbon steel, which holds a sharp edge far longer than blades with a lower carbon content. With a little work, the knife keeps a good sharp edge and works perfectly. The Wusthof chef knife has better weight than any knife I had held before, also a solid point in its favor. It is relatively well balanced and has a full tang, meaning the steel extends the entire length of the knife, into the handle, where it is riveted in place.

Cutco 9.25 inch chef knife

About 3 years ago I bought the Cutco chef knife. First, it is far longer than most other chef knives. This is good when I am chopping a larger quantity of food, but generally it is just long. I am less accustomed to the length, so that is a minus. The weight or heft of the knife is light in comparison to the Wusthof Classic chef knife. It looks nice, but is less balanced in my hand. It does have full tang and the handles are riveted in place. It is a sharp knife, but the company wants it shipped to them for sharpening. This is nice, in the sense that one knows it will be sharpened properly. It is an aggravation to have to take the knife somewhere else. All in all not a bad knife, but not my first choice or recommendation.

Wusthof Grand Prix 7 inch Santoku

In 1998 the Wusthof Classic line did not have a Santoku knife, so I got the Grand Prix Santoku. It does not suit me well, though I use it occasionally. The Santoku blade has little wells cut into the blade, for the purpose of easy release of foods when chopping foods or carving meats. The Grand Prix line does not have the good weight of the Classic line, does not have full tang, and the blade has a straighter edge. For straight down chopping, this works fine. I do a lot of rocker chopping, using the tip of the knife as a pivot and coming down again and again. The Wusthof Grand Prix Santoku does not function well for this application.

Hammer Stahl 7.5 inch Santoku

This year I bought a Hammer Stahl 7.5 inch Santoku knife. I have been using it almost exclusively ever since. This knife is also made of high carbon steel. The weight of the knife is impressive, though extremely well balanced in the hand. The weight makes chopping seem effortless. The shape of the handle fits well in the hand. It is a Santoku blade, though the little wells are much farther back from the blade edge. The line of the blade has more curve, unlike the Wusthof Grand Prix Santoku, allowing great ease with pivot chopping. The blade has full tang, and the knife is a thing of beauty with the resin impregnated Pakka wood handles. For great grip, weight and balance, this is the best knife I own. It is still very sharp after half a year of constant use.

Any really good knife is going to be relatively expensive. These knives range from 60 dollars for the Wusthof Grand Prix Santoku to 160 dollars for the Hammer Stahl Santoku. The Wusthof chef knife costs about 130 dollars, where the Cutco chef knife is about 150 dollars. If possible, go to a store that sells high quality knives and try them out first. Decide what kind of knife you will use most and invest in at least one good knife.

Thank you for taking the time to read my article. I hope it was informative and helped you along your own culinary journey.



Source by Chris Rawstern