Factors Affecting Microwave Recipes Cooking

FACTORS WHICH AFFECT COOKING

Several factors which influence timing and results in conventional cooking are exaggerated by microwave speed..

From conventional cooking you are familiar with the idea that more food takes more time.

Two cups of water take longer to boil than one.

Size of food is important, too.

Cut up potatoes cook faster than whole ones.

These differences are more apparent in microwaving, since energy penetrates and turns to heat directly in the food.

Knowing what affects the speed and evenness of cooking will help you enjoy all the advantages of microwaving.

Piece Size: In both conventional and microwave cook-ing, small pieces cook faster than large ones. Pieces which are similar in size and shape cook more evenly.

Starting Temperature: Foods taken from the refrigerator take longer to cook than foods at room temperature. Timings in our recipes are based on the temperatures at which you normally store the foods.

Density of Food: In both conventional and microwave cooking, dense foods, such as a potato, take longer to cook or heat than light, porous foods, such as a piece of cake, bread or a roll.

Quantity of Food: In both types of cooking, small amounts usually take less time than large ones. This is most apparent in microwave cooking, where time is di-rectly related to the number of servings. Shape of Food: In both types of cooking, thin areas cook faster than thick ones. This can be controlled in micro-waving by placing thick pieces to the outside edge with thin pieces to the center.

Height in Oven: In both types of cooking, areas which are closest to the source of heat or energy cook faster. For even microwaving, turn over or shield vulnerable foods which are higher than 5 inches.

Boiling: Microwaves exaggerate boiling in milk-based foods. A temperature probe turns off the oven before foods boil over. Use a lower power setting and watch carefully when not using a probe. Prick Foods to Release Pressure: Steam builds up pressure in foods which are tightly covered by a skin or membrane. Prick potatoes (as you do conventionally), egg yolks and chicken livers to prevent bursting.

Round Shapes: Since microwaves penetrate foods to about 1 -in. from top, bottom and sides, round shapes and rings cook more evenly. Corners receive more energy and may overcook. This may also happen conventionally

Bury Vulnerable Foods: Foods which attract microwave energy, such as cheese or meat, should, when possible, be buried in sauce or other ingredients. In conventional stewing or pot roasting, meat not covered with liquid dries out.



Source by Lena Arunkumar

Best Chili Recipes – 5 Tips For Cooking Great Chili!

Chili is a metaphysical thing in the world of cooking. There are major competitions all over the United States, and believe me they can get really cutthroat. People take their chili seriously! Chili is a creation that is highly personal to the person that has created the dish. Lots of folks can work a lifetime to perfect a chili recipe and that is no joke. Just ask anyone that has ever competed in a chili cook off. If you are a newbie to the world of chili and want to get out of “the canned stuff,” then welcome! Even if you are an old hat at making chili, welcome! The tips herein will do no harm and only enhance your chili experience! Lets get some tips!

Tip 1. What if your chili is too thick? What kind of chili is it? White?, Red? Beef? Chicken? If your chili is too thick do not use water to thin it out that is what everyone in the world does. Use broth instead! Water will “kill” the hard worked for flavor of your chili creation. Broth adds the liquid that you need and unlike water it also adds flavor and depth to your chili recipe!

Tip 2. What if your chili is way to thin? You could add some tomato paste to it as one way to thicken it. Try it a little bit by little bit until you achieve the consistency that you are looking for! What if the tomato paste does not make your chili thick the way you want it to? Then the next step is to try to use something like cornstarch or corn flour commonly called masa flour! You can also try the old school use of cornmeal. I like this one myself. Cornmeal gives a good texture. Some people I know in the Southern United States say to just use good old fashioned instant mashed potatoes. Not bad! It works and adds texture as well. Then the is the no calorie way to do it by using arrow root mixed with a bit of water and then added to the chili and stirred. As you can see there are many way to make your chili thicker. The choice is yours and you should experiment.

Tip 3. Most people that I know of that make chili at home just use plain old boring everyday Jalapeno’s. This is fine in most cases and they do bring the “heat!” But the fact of the matter is that there is a world of different chilies out there. Anaheim, Poblano, Serrano, Sante Fe Chilies, Ancho Chilies, The very popular these days Chipotle in Adobo sauce or Chipotle powder, Cayenne, Tabascos, Thai Chili, Habanera, and Scotch Bonnets! The list can go on and on from country to country. So why not try to use more than one type of chili pepper in your chili? Change the flavor, do not settle for the mundane! Have fun!

Tip 4. first thing is first! Cook the meat! Any meat that you are using should be cooked first. Brown the meat way before you have to add the liquids to the recipe. Browning the meat aids in locking in the flavor of the meat. You do not want your meat to get soggy with the liquids from the chili recipe. I prefer to sear cook my meat. That is turn the flame up high and putting the meat in the pan of my fave the cast iron skillet and so it sizzles quick and stir it around a bit and then turn the heat down. This is a classic searing technique that locks the flavor into the meat.

Tip 5. The better the meat the better the meal! It is a fact that the better the quality of any meat or main component for a meal the better the meal. Remember that is it quality over quantity! Just because you can get some meats cheap and get lot’s of it does not mean that it is quality meat and that you will get a quality meal. If you have to use a cheaper meat that is less tender then expect to cook your chili longer to soften it up and consider using a meat tenderizer on it to aid in the softening of the cheaper cuts and cook the chili longer and you should be OK. In the long run if you can afford to get the better cuts then I always day do it!



Source by Richard L. Blaine

Schlemmertopf Clay Pot Recipes – Fun Cooking for a Healthy Holiday Diet

We all desire to eat healthy so we try to get a good diet every day. But it’s hard to do that on the Christmas season where food is abundant. One of the modern ways to maintain a good eating lifestyle even on the holidays is preparing food in clay pots – and Schlemmertop can be your partner.

The original glazed Schlemmertop is a type of clay cookware with a lightly-glazed bottom to offer more advantages to cooking in clay. If washing cookware is a daunting process for you, you will find glazed clay pot easier to clean as food particles, flavors, spices, and odors are not absorbed into the pot. While this clay is glazed, it offers the same healthy meals, without added fats and oils, that unglazed clay cookware can give. With it, your food is also cooked in their natural juices, with all liquids, flavor, taste, nutrients and vitamins retained.

Try this savory Schlemmertopf clay recipe with the essence of fresh herbs.

Stuffed Flank Steak

Ingredients

  • 1 flank steak
  • Some flour
  • 4 cups bread cubes
  • 3/4 cup of fresh celery, chopped
  • 2 small onions, chopped
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sage
  • Salt and pepper

Procedure

Always begin with the basic requirement when using clay pots. Soak lid of Glazed Schlemmertopf clay pot. Position flank steak crosswise then dust with salt and pepper; dredge with the flour and pound well with a potato masher. In a small bowl, bring together bread cubes, onions, celery and sage. Dampen with a little amount of water then season with salt and pepper. Spread stuffing over the flank steak. When done, roll the meat and tie or fasten the edge with toothpicks. Put in your Schlemmertopf clay pot and cover. Place into the cold oven and turn temperature to 425 degrees F. Bake for 115-120 minutes. By then, you’ll get a lovely crust and juicy steak.

Cooking Schlemmertopf clay recipes is a fun way to savor your favorite foods even on the long holidays. For an added advantage, the glazed pot is easy to clean without bacteria build up; no worry about mold and no staining or problems with food sticking. You may even serve your dish directly from the pot to your holiday dinner table. Note that if it stays covered, your food will remain hot for a long time. This makes cooking in clay not just an ideal way to cook low-fat diets but a traditional trick to enjoy warm food from the beginning to the end of your meals.

So this Christmas, enjoy Schlemmertop clay pot recipes for a healthy holiday diet!



Source by Terry Retter