Difference Between T304 and T316 Waterless Stainless Steel Cookware

When shopping for waterless cookware, it is important to determine your priorities. What cookware pieces are you most likely to use? What type of steam control mechanism would you like-steam valve or thermo control knob? To be classified as waterless cookware, the cookware must be at least 5 ply (layers), have some type of steam-control valve and have a flat, encapsulated bottom that contains the metal layers enclosed in stainless steel. Waterless cookware is typically sold on the Internet, home parties, or state and county fairs. The cookware sold in department store environments is generally 3-ply. Waterless cookware because of its composition and construction is more expensive than conventional cookware. However, even within the waterless cookware market, there is quite a price range between competitors. Most waterless cookware is T304 surgical stainless steel. T304 cookware has the following advantages including corrosion resistance, temperature resistance, flavor protection, and ease in cleaning. With proper care and maintenance, this cookware will keep its shine and beauty for a lifetime. Recently, a few companies have started to use T316 in their cookware. While there are some distinct differences between the two, the visible eye cannot detect any difference between the two. Further, there is not a distinguishable difference in taste either. What then is the actual difference between the two grades of stainless steel?

Type 304 contains 20% chromium or more and 10% nickel, comed with 0.08% carbon. It is used for chemical processing equipment, for food, dairy and beverage industries, for heat exchangers, and for milder chemicals. In the cookware industry, the 304 steel is most often used in the manufacturing process. T304 has the ability to withstand the corrosive action of various acids found in fruits, meats, milk, and vegetables. Therefore, it is often used for sinks, tabletops, coffee urns, stoves, refrigerators, milk and cream dispensers and steam tables.

Type 316 contains 16% to 18% chromium and 11% to 14% nickel. Type 316 also contains 2% molybdenum. The molybdenum is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts.) Type 316 is the main stainless steel used in the marine environment, with the exception of screws, bolts, nuts, and other fasteners where strength and wear resistance are necessary. Then Type 304 is typically used.

Do the differences specified above justify spending over $3000 for Saladmaster that now uses 316 stainless steel? Saladmaster offers a great product but many people simply cannot afford such an investment in cookware. When comparing the two grades, the differences are negligible. When exposed to harsh sea salt conditions 24 hours a day for 7 days a week, T316 would last longer under those conditions. If exposed to high concentrations of sodium chloride, T316 is definitely preferable. Therefore, if you are were to put one cup of sodium chloride (table salt) into 4 ounces of water on a daily basis, you would benefit from using the 316 stainless steel over the 304.

If you are considering the purchase of this cookware, two of your primary questions should be: (1) Which cookware set offers the pieces that I would most likely use? (2) What type of steam control valve would I prefer-the steam-control value that has an open/shut lever or the Thermo-control value that has a color-coded dial that visibly shows the cooking temperature.

Waterless cookware is a lifetime investment. While T316 cookware might be the best option for marine use, the majority of cooks can feel comfortable using T304 surgical stainless steel. If you can’t afford several thousand dollars for state-of-the-art cookware, don’t be dismayed. You can still buy quality waterless cookware at a fraction of that cost.. Check out our site-The Gourmets Cookware for some great deals on waterless cookware. In addition, we offer tips for cooking with waterless cookware, cleaning your stainless steel cookware, and great recipes to try with your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware – A Lifetime of Value

Over a million synthetic pots and pans are tossed in landfills every year. These nonstick wonders don’t seem to last very long, 3 to 5 years is common. If you’re re-investing in new cookware, consider replacing your Teflon with a far more cost-effective solution. Consider the value of Stainless Steel Waterless cookware.

The Investment

Comparably priced nonstick stainless steel waterless cookware (between $150 and $250) will save some serious coin over the years. These quality pots and pans are warranted to last for your lifetime.

The Bargain

Durability is a good measure of value. If cookware doesn’t last, it’s no bargain. Too, it’s best to cook on a nonstick surface free of toxicity. Teflon fuming, peeling and erosion represent a serious health hazard as does leaching from soft metal cooking surfaces like copper, aluminum, cast iron and others.

Stainless steel waterless utensils confidently provide the ideal nonstick cooking surface free of toxic risk or continuous ‘seasoning’ to manage rust, “…the closest thing we have to the ideal chemically inert but thermally responsive pan” says Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen: Scribner 2004, page 791. (Search ‘Waterless Cookware: Hype or the Real Thing’ for more on McGee).

The Bonus

Imagine the value of having a lifetime to explore and enjoy the most hygienic, responsive, food-friendly, cook-friendly, earth-friendly and health-friendly set of pots and pans you can own. Yes, ‘friendly’ because cooks, food and cookware are best served when engaged in a supportive relationship, one of consistent service and celebration, learning and triumph.

Included in this friendship are family, friends and another very important member to be invited, seated and served at the dining table, one of robust taste and aroma, of natural nutrients and energy, of wholesome vitality and healing health. There’s no substitute for nature’s honest foods, no ‘fortified’ material worthy of the name ‘whole food’ (search ‘waterless cookware, the healthy choice‘).

The Value

It’s no secret that much of today’s food has evolved for the sake of convenience and not nutrition. The composition and function of modern cookware has evolved as well, and not for the better. For example, synthetic or ceramic coatings on the inside and colorful enameled coatings on the outside don’t reflect cookware value, good health or good sense. Coatings are cosmetic at best, ‘cover-ups’ applied to lesser grades of steel used in fabrication. Look below the skin for a lifetime of value.

Let’s revisit the purpose of food (and the cookware that cooks it) to more fully appreciate the value of quality stainless steel waterless cookware:

Cooking is actually a moment of truth, a culmination of nature’s food cycle, a moment when the vital cache of earth’s nutrient goodness is tastefully enhanced or sadly wasted. A pot or pan is more than an appliance to heat processed food material or boil away nature’s precious minerals, vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. Real food deserves better. There’s simply more to the enriching soils of organic vegetables and free-range meats, more to engage the palate, the nose, the eyes, more to savor and certainly more to revitalize and re-energize. We are, after all, only as healthy as the health of that which we eat. To that end, pots and pans are a huge contributor to the nutritional and savory fate of foods. Much can be gained or lost in the simple act of cooking.

Stainless steel waterless cookware honors and retains the goodness of nature’s honest efforts. As with good friends or marriage or other maturing relationships, a partnership with food and cooking takes time to appreciate and thrive. It helps to have cookware that’s reliable, steady, dependable, trusted, capable of ideal cooking conditions simply and easily mastered. Cooking is life long. We might as well mature a friendship with cookware durable and worthy enough to nurture and sustain this kind of relationship.

The Return on Investment

Your grandma likely used similar pots and pans way back when. Stainless Steel cookware isn’t new, but grandma’s originals lacked many of today’s Waterless features:

– Multi-ply stainless steel fabrication, 5-, 7-, or 9-ply 18/10 chromium/nickel construction for quality

– Capsulated heat-conductive elements (copper, aluminum, etc.) for unparalleled low-heat cooking

– Steam Control covers to fully preserve and retain nutritious vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants

– Thermally responsive, efficient utensils to cook faster, safer, more evenly and economically

These and many other improvements now render today’s waterless utensil capable of cooking food the way it was meant to be cooked, the way Mother Nature intended her vegetables and meats to be served, fully appreciated, fully valued, fully themselves. To serve anything less isn’t a bargain, it’s a wasted opportunity for all concerned, especially food.

When real food is experienced (cooked as Mother Nature intended), one tends to develop an honest taste and firm loyalty. My acquired personal preference of 30 years as family cook, and my business specialty, is Stainless Steel Waterless pots and pans. Being in the business I’m confident I speak for others in this specialty when I share this fact: not a day goes by without hearing from folks looking to replace a pot handle or lid knob on their cookware. These little attachments, durable as they are, eventually wear out. Here’s a sample of today’s customer requests from ChoiceCookery’s on-line Contact Us page:

“I have a set of Flavor-Seal by Cory cookware that I bought in 1963. I need to replace the handles on the large fry pan. Are they available?”

“My mom has a set of Miracle Maid pans she got when she was married. She loves them, but the electric fry pan has a short in the cord and we would like to get a new cord. Can you help us?”

“I need to replace the vented knobs on my Royal Queen waterless cookware. I have had it for 27 years and I love it but over time the knobs have begun to lose their ability to seal the moisture in. Could you give me information about how to order? Thank you in advance.”

“I can’t find Nutri-Seal anywhere. Can you help me? I need a new handle on my 8qt stock pot.”

“I’d like to order a vent knob for my set, Maxam KT17. It has been thirty years since I brought them home, lots of cooking mishaps along the way and the handle on my roaster finally broke. Please call me.”

We called. And yes, all these cooks were relieved to know replacements are still available.

1) Trust a brand that’s here to stay. Maxam, the brand we represent, has been innovating and manufacturing stainless steel waterless cookware for over 60 years.

2) For businesses like ours, there’s a beautiful irony here. Unlike disposable bargain cookware, our pots and pans last a lifetime. Our customers return of course, usually to purchase a set of cookware for their grown children or a grandchild’s wedding, maybe a handle or knob for themselves (a $12 replacement easily attached, adding another 30 years of cookware service and value). These folks tend to share the good news with family and friends. Too, they’re experiencing a cookware partnership they are not about to give up! Loyalty is honestly earned and yes, priceless.

The Bottom Line

Look beyond 3-to-5 years. Invest in cookware that matures your relationship with food and cooking. For me, it’s about two hats I wear and a bond that ties them together, a hat I experience everyday as family cook and a friendship with customers embracing the simple joys and lifelong value of waterless pots and pans.

Your friendship with food and cooking simply can’t be explored, experienced and enjoyed using cookware less capable than stainless steel waterless pots and pans. Bargain prices and cosmetic glitz just can’t appreciate in value. Consider cookware you’ll never have to (or want to) replace. Real value keeps giving for your lifetime, but that’s just our warranty. Cook healthy, eat honestly, and thrive.



Source by Steve Denning

Which Metal Is Better For A Turkey Fryer – Stainless Steel Or Aluminum?

Classic propane turkey fryers come in 2 different metals-stainless steel or aluminum. They both have good points, they both have not so good points.

First and foremost stainless steel is easier to clean than aluminum. Aluminum must be cleaned right away. It will pit and get a sticky layer of residue on it that is hard to get rid of. Stainless stock pots and patio stoves will usually clean up with soap, water, and a sponge. The bottom of the aluminum pots are much harder to get the black soot from the LP gas off of as well. There is a lot more elbow grease involved when it comes to the aluminum turkey fryers. There is an oxidation factor over time that will cause the aluminum to take on a graying color. That will not happen with the steel.

Secondly, an aluminum stock pot is a better heat conductor than a stainless one. That means your frying oil will heat quicker. There is a reason that some stainless steel pots are made with copper bottoms. Copper is a better heat conductor than many other metals. It helps to more evenly distribute the heat in a stainless steel pan. The conductivity of copper is among the highest, stainless steel one of the lowest, with aluminum somewhere in between. (The aluminum pot will also cool down quicker after cooking).

Last but not least. Cost is a factor. Stainless steel is much more expensive than aluminum. (This is probably why they don’t make stainless steel fryer pots with copper bottoms). It is also heavier than aluminum, so if you are having it shipped, again cost may be a factor. If this is your first time around with a turkey fryer, the cost of aluminum may be the way to go. You may not like the process.

You may decide that this is not for you. Should that be the case, there is not a lot of money lost, and you can probably resell it quite easily. On the other hand, you may love it and decide to fry everything in the house. Then you may go on to use your pot for other things, like backyard New England clam bakes, or chili for a tailgate party. If that is the case, you may want to have an aluminum fryer as a starter fryer, and eventually move on to a healthy relationship with a beautiful shiny stainless steel fryer.

So, stainless steel or aluminum? No matter which metal you decide to go with for your outdoor propane deep fryer pot, as long as they are cared for properly, both will last you a life time.



Source by Jenifer Whelan

Belgique Stainless Steel Copper Bottom 18-10 Cookware

I Love these pots! They are worth the investment. They were bought on a strict budget and I do not regret the investment.

Belgique cookware is very beautiful to look at, but keeping it that way takes a little TLC. Excellent for use on a gas stove. Be extra careful when using electric stove though. Typically, electric burners are much hotter than cooking on a gas top. This cookware is designed to cook at lower heat. If your burner gets too hot, it will discolor the pan and possibly scar the copper bottom. Also, keep in mind that discoloration stains do not effect performance. There should be a care card that comes with each set that mentions these possibilities if cooking with electric heat. It also recommends for best results to season interiors by wiping with a little cooking oil. Seasoning is recommended 3 to 4 times a year. Belgique ‘s copper bottom has a protective layer to keep it from tarnishing in its packaging. This covering must be removed before using, otherwise the protective layer will burn to the copper base and leave black marks. To remove the protective layer dissolve 3 tablespoons of baking soda in 3 quarts of hot water and let the pan soak for 20 minutes. Rinse with cold water. After the removal of the protective layer, use a copper polish to retain the copper’s luster.

Here is a few more tips that may help keep your Belgique looking as great as when you first got them.

1. They may look hard and smooth, but all pans and cookware are porous. Seasoning prevents a porous cooking surface from becoming carbonized within the ridges of its rough surface. By filling in these ridges, a barrier is created that prevents food from sticking to the surface.

2. Season metal cookware immediately after bringing it home from the store. Wash the item(s) in soapy water to remove any protective coating, then rinse and then dry with a towel.

3. Place the pan on a burner set on medium-low or in a 300-degree oven for about five minutes to thoroughly dry. Remove the pan from the oven with an oven mitt.

4. Place a few teaspoons of either peanut oil or lard on the pan and wipe it down with a paper or cloth towel. Now place the pan on the stovetop and remove once it begins to smoke. Another option is to put it back in the oven for 20 minutes. Let the pan cool, then wipe off any excess oil.

Belgique Cookware Copper



Source by Charlie Levy

Belgique Stainless Steel Copper Bottom 18-10 Cookware

I Love these pots! They are worth the investment. They were bought on a strict budget and I do not regret the investment.

Belgique cookware is very beautiful to look at, but keeping it that way takes a little TLC. Excellent for use on a gas stove. Be extra careful when using electric stove though. Typically, electric burners are much hotter than cooking on a gas top. This cookware is designed to cook at lower heat. If your burner gets too hot, it will discolor the pan and possibly scar the copper bottom. Also, keep in mind that discoloration stains do not effect performance. There should be a care card that comes with each set that mentions these possibilities if cooking with electric heat. It also recommends for best results to season interiors by wiping with a little cooking oil. Seasoning is recommended 3 to 4 times a year. Belgique ‘s copper bottom has a protective layer to keep it from tarnishing in its packaging. This covering must be removed before using, otherwise the protective layer will burn to the copper base and leave black marks. To remove the protective layer dissolve 3 tablespoons of baking soda in 3 quarts of hot water and let the pan soak for 20 minutes. Rinse with cold water. After the removal of the protective layer, use a copper polish to retain the copper’s luster.

Here is a few more tips that may help keep your Belgique looking as great as when you first got them.

1. They may look hard and smooth, but all pans and cookware are porous. Seasoning prevents a porous cooking surface from becoming carbonized within the ridges of its rough surface. By filling in these ridges, a barrier is created that prevents food from sticking to the surface.

2. Season metal cookware immediately after bringing it home from the store. Wash the item(s) in soapy water to remove any protective coating, then rinse and then dry with a towel.

3. Place the pan on a burner set on medium-low or in a 300-degree oven for about five minutes to thoroughly dry. Remove the pan from the oven with an oven mitt.

4. Place a few teaspoons of either peanut oil or lard on the pan and wipe it down with a paper or cloth towel. Now place the pan on the stovetop and remove once it begins to smoke. Another option is to put it back in the oven for 20 minutes. Let the pan cool, then wipe off any excess oil.

Belgique Cookware Copper



Source by Charlie Levy

Is It Safe to Use Scratched Stainless Steel Cookware?

Stainless steel cookware is considered a good choice of cookware for the kitchen. It is the most popular cookware in North America. It is heavy-duty, durable, corrosive resistant and easy to maintain. However, it does get scratched if not being used and cared for properly which makes we wonder if it is safe using scratched stainless steel cookware.

Stainless steel cookware is made of iron, chromium and nickel. When abrasive materials are used on stainless pot or pan, the pot or pan might get scratched eventually. When cooking with a scratched stainless pot or pan, a small amount of iron, chromium and nickel will be released to the foods. Consuming a large amount of iron can cause excessive levels of iron in our blood which can be danger and at risk. The dietary reference intake lists the tolerable intake iron level for adults as 45 mg per day. The tolerable intake iron level for children under fourteen years old is 40 mg per day. The daily chromium intake in the United States is 35 mg for adult male and 25 mg for adult female. Cooking with nickel containing in stainless cookware will not add a significant amount of nickel to the everyday meal. However, sensitive individuals may show allergic reaction to nickel.

Studies have shown that using light scratched stainless cookware does not pose any significant risk to health concerns. It is said that the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking with the scratched pot or pan is less than the percentage of total daily intake. Nevertheless, if stainless pot or pan is severely damaged with deep scratches or shown signs of corrosion, it is recommended the pot or pan should be discarded. Severe damaged with deep scratches pots and pans should not be used since it is uncertain of the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking, and therefore might cause significant health concerns. It is also recommended individuals who have allergic reactions to nickel should avoid using nickel containing in stainless steel cookware.

Best of all, it is a good practice to only use soft cloth when cleaning to prevent damaging stainless cookware. To minimize the cause of damages, it is suggested abrasive cleaners are not used when washing, and avoid using sharp and pointy utensils when cooking. Although stainless steel cookware is resilient, without proper care, it can be damaged. When stainless cookware is damaged, it will not be at its best performance. For example, stainless pot or pan with copper-coated bottom can lose its good heat conduction when the copper layer is scratched. Consequently, damages also lessen the pot or pan’s lifetime value and appearance.

In summary, light scratched stainless steel cookware does not pose any risks to health concerns. Using light scratched stainless pot or pan is harmless as only a small amount of iron, chromium and nickel be released when cooking. Consuming a small percentage of iron, chromium and nickel which is less than the percentage of daily intake does not add significant to health issues. However, if the pot or pan is deeply scratched, it is recommended the pot or pan should not be used as the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking might be poisonous. It is important to properly use and care for stainless steel cookware. In order to keep stainless cookware at its best performance, avoid using abrasive materials when cooking or cleaning stainless pot or pan. By doing so, it certainly will prevent causing damages to the pot or pan and therefore enhance its durability and lifetime.



Source by Mimi Lou

Difference Between T304 and T316 Waterless Stainless Steel Cookware

When shopping for waterless cookware, it is important to determine your priorities. What cookware pieces are you most likely to use? What type of steam control mechanism would you like-steam valve or thermo control knob? To be classified as waterless cookware, the cookware must be at least 5 ply (layers), have some type of steam-control valve and have a flat, encapsulated bottom that contains the metal layers enclosed in stainless steel. Waterless cookware is typically sold on the Internet, home parties, or state and county fairs. The cookware sold in department store environments is generally 3-ply. Waterless cookware because of its composition and construction is more expensive than conventional cookware. However, even within the waterless cookware market, there is quite a price range between competitors. Most waterless cookware is T304 surgical stainless steel. T304 cookware has the following advantages including corrosion resistance, temperature resistance, flavor protection, and ease in cleaning. With proper care and maintenance, this cookware will keep its shine and beauty for a lifetime. Recently, a few companies have started to use T316 in their cookware. While there are some distinct differences between the two, the visible eye cannot detect any difference between the two. Further, there is not a distinguishable difference in taste either. What then is the actual difference between the two grades of stainless steel?

Type 304 contains 20% chromium or more and 10% nickel, comed with 0.08% carbon. It is used for chemical processing equipment, for food, dairy and beverage industries, for heat exchangers, and for milder chemicals. In the cookware industry, the 304 steel is most often used in the manufacturing process. T304 has the ability to withstand the corrosive action of various acids found in fruits, meats, milk, and vegetables. Therefore, it is often used for sinks, tabletops, coffee urns, stoves, refrigerators, milk and cream dispensers and steam tables.

Type 316 contains 16% to 18% chromium and 11% to 14% nickel. Type 316 also contains 2% molybdenum. The molybdenum is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts.) Type 316 is the main stainless steel used in the marine environment, with the exception of screws, bolts, nuts, and other fasteners where strength and wear resistance are necessary. Then Type 304 is typically used.

Do the differences specified above justify spending over $3000 for Saladmaster that now uses 316 stainless steel? Saladmaster offers a great product but many people simply cannot afford such an investment in cookware. When comparing the two grades, the differences are negligible. When exposed to harsh sea salt conditions 24 hours a day for 7 days a week, T316 would last longer under those conditions. If exposed to high concentrations of sodium chloride, T316 is definitely preferable. Therefore, if you are were to put one cup of sodium chloride (table salt) into 4 ounces of water on a daily basis, you would benefit from using the 316 stainless steel over the 304.

If you are considering the purchase of this cookware, two of your primary questions should be: (1) Which cookware set offers the pieces that I would most likely use? (2) What type of steam control valve would I prefer-the steam-control value that has an open/shut lever or the Thermo-control value that has a color-coded dial that visibly shows the cooking temperature.

Waterless cookware is a lifetime investment. While T316 cookware might be the best option for marine use, the majority of cooks can feel comfortable using T304 surgical stainless steel. If you can’t afford several thousand dollars for state-of-the-art cookware, don’t be dismayed. You can still buy quality waterless cookware at a fraction of that cost.. Check out our site-The Gourmets Cookware for some great deals on waterless cookware. In addition, we offer tips for cooking with waterless cookware, cleaning your stainless steel cookware, and great recipes to try with your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware – A Lifetime of Value

Over a million synthetic pots and pans are tossed in landfills every year. These nonstick wonders don’t seem to last very long, 3 to 5 years is common. If you’re re-investing in new cookware, consider replacing your Teflon with a far more cost-effective solution. Consider the value of Stainless Steel Waterless cookware.

The Investment

Comparably priced nonstick stainless steel waterless cookware (between $150 and $250) will save some serious coin over the years. These quality pots and pans are warranted to last for your lifetime.

The Bargain

Durability is a good measure of value. If cookware doesn’t last, it’s no bargain. Too, it’s best to cook on a nonstick surface free of toxicity. Teflon fuming, peeling and erosion represent a serious health hazard as does leaching from soft metal cooking surfaces like copper, aluminum, cast iron and others.

Stainless steel waterless utensils confidently provide the ideal nonstick cooking surface free of toxic risk or continuous ‘seasoning’ to manage rust, “…the closest thing we have to the ideal chemically inert but thermally responsive pan” says Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen: Scribner 2004, page 791. (Search ‘Waterless Cookware: Hype or the Real Thing’ for more on McGee).

The Bonus

Imagine the value of having a lifetime to explore and enjoy the most hygienic, responsive, food-friendly, cook-friendly, earth-friendly and health-friendly set of pots and pans you can own. Yes, ‘friendly’ because cooks, food and cookware are best served when engaged in a supportive relationship, one of consistent service and celebration, learning and triumph.

Included in this friendship are family, friends and another very important member to be invited, seated and served at the dining table, one of robust taste and aroma, of natural nutrients and energy, of wholesome vitality and healing health. There’s no substitute for nature’s honest foods, no ‘fortified’ material worthy of the name ‘whole food’ (search ‘waterless cookware, the healthy choice‘).

The Value

It’s no secret that much of today’s food has evolved for the sake of convenience and not nutrition. The composition and function of modern cookware has evolved as well, and not for the better. For example, synthetic or ceramic coatings on the inside and colorful enameled coatings on the outside don’t reflect cookware value, good health or good sense. Coatings are cosmetic at best, ‘cover-ups’ applied to lesser grades of steel used in fabrication. Look below the skin for a lifetime of value.

Let’s revisit the purpose of food (and the cookware that cooks it) to more fully appreciate the value of quality stainless steel waterless cookware:

Cooking is actually a moment of truth, a culmination of nature’s food cycle, a moment when the vital cache of earth’s nutrient goodness is tastefully enhanced or sadly wasted. A pot or pan is more than an appliance to heat processed food material or boil away nature’s precious minerals, vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. Real food deserves better. There’s simply more to the enriching soils of organic vegetables and free-range meats, more to engage the palate, the nose, the eyes, more to savor and certainly more to revitalize and re-energize. We are, after all, only as healthy as the health of that which we eat. To that end, pots and pans are a huge contributor to the nutritional and savory fate of foods. Much can be gained or lost in the simple act of cooking.

Stainless steel waterless cookware honors and retains the goodness of nature’s honest efforts. As with good friends or marriage or other maturing relationships, a partnership with food and cooking takes time to appreciate and thrive. It helps to have cookware that’s reliable, steady, dependable, trusted, capable of ideal cooking conditions simply and easily mastered. Cooking is life long. We might as well mature a friendship with cookware durable and worthy enough to nurture and sustain this kind of relationship.

The Return on Investment

Your grandma likely used similar pots and pans way back when. Stainless Steel cookware isn’t new, but grandma’s originals lacked many of today’s Waterless features:

– Multi-ply stainless steel fabrication, 5-, 7-, or 9-ply 18/10 chromium/nickel construction for quality

– Capsulated heat-conductive elements (copper, aluminum, etc.) for unparalleled low-heat cooking

– Steam Control covers to fully preserve and retain nutritious vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants

– Thermally responsive, efficient utensils to cook faster, safer, more evenly and economically

These and many other improvements now render today’s waterless utensil capable of cooking food the way it was meant to be cooked, the way Mother Nature intended her vegetables and meats to be served, fully appreciated, fully valued, fully themselves. To serve anything less isn’t a bargain, it’s a wasted opportunity for all concerned, especially food.

When real food is experienced (cooked as Mother Nature intended), one tends to develop an honest taste and firm loyalty. My acquired personal preference of 30 years as family cook, and my business specialty, is Stainless Steel Waterless pots and pans. Being in the business I’m confident I speak for others in this specialty when I share this fact: not a day goes by without hearing from folks looking to replace a pot handle or lid knob on their cookware. These little attachments, durable as they are, eventually wear out. Here’s a sample of today’s customer requests from ChoiceCookery’s on-line Contact Us page:

“I have a set of Flavor-Seal by Cory cookware that I bought in 1963. I need to replace the handles on the large fry pan. Are they available?”

“My mom has a set of Miracle Maid pans she got when she was married. She loves them, but the electric fry pan has a short in the cord and we would like to get a new cord. Can you help us?”

“I need to replace the vented knobs on my Royal Queen waterless cookware. I have had it for 27 years and I love it but over time the knobs have begun to lose their ability to seal the moisture in. Could you give me information about how to order? Thank you in advance.”

“I can’t find Nutri-Seal anywhere. Can you help me? I need a new handle on my 8qt stock pot.”

“I’d like to order a vent knob for my set, Maxam KT17. It has been thirty years since I brought them home, lots of cooking mishaps along the way and the handle on my roaster finally broke. Please call me.”

We called. And yes, all these cooks were relieved to know replacements are still available.

1) Trust a brand that’s here to stay. Maxam, the brand we represent, has been innovating and manufacturing stainless steel waterless cookware for over 60 years.

2) For businesses like ours, there’s a beautiful irony here. Unlike disposable bargain cookware, our pots and pans last a lifetime. Our customers return of course, usually to purchase a set of cookware for their grown children or a grandchild’s wedding, maybe a handle or knob for themselves (a $12 replacement easily attached, adding another 30 years of cookware service and value). These folks tend to share the good news with family and friends. Too, they’re experiencing a cookware partnership they are not about to give up! Loyalty is honestly earned and yes, priceless.

The Bottom Line

Look beyond 3-to-5 years. Invest in cookware that matures your relationship with food and cooking. For me, it’s about two hats I wear and a bond that ties them together, a hat I experience everyday as family cook and a friendship with customers embracing the simple joys and lifelong value of waterless pots and pans.

Your friendship with food and cooking simply can’t be explored, experienced and enjoyed using cookware less capable than stainless steel waterless pots and pans. Bargain prices and cosmetic glitz just can’t appreciate in value. Consider cookware you’ll never have to (or want to) replace. Real value keeps giving for your lifetime, but that’s just our warranty. Cook healthy, eat honestly, and thrive.



Source by Steve Denning

How to Cook With Cuisinart Stainless Steel Cookware – 3 Helpful Tips for Easier Cooking

If you’re new to cooking with Cuisinart stainless cookware, there are some things you should know about how best to use your new pots and pans. In this article, I’ll discuss how to cook with Cuisinart stainless steel cookware, so you can make the most of your new set.

1.) Do you need to preseason your Cuisinart Stainless Steel Cookware?

While preseasoning your stainless steel pots and pans isn’t absolutely necessary, it does help to prevent food from sticking. Stainless steel cookware doesn’t have a non-stick interior, like many of the pots and pans you can buy. The steel is very porous, and therefore it’s easy for food to get “stuck” within these pores. Seasoning the cookware helps to seal up these pores and prevent sticking.

To season your stainless steel pan, cover the bottom of the pan with oil and salt. You’ll want to pour in about 1/2″ to 3/4″ of oil. Place the pan on your stove burner, and heat it up until the oil begins smoking. Remove the pan from the heat and allow it to cool, until it is safe to touch and discard the oil and salt. Next, take a soft cloth and wipe out any remaining oil and salt. Your pan is now ready to use!

Now remember the porous nature of the pan I mentioned previously? This also means that whenever you wash the pan in hot water, those pores will open back up, and the oil used to season will be washed away. Therefore, you’ll probably want to repeat this process after washing your pan. Again, the preseasoning isn’t necessary, but it does help to eliminate a lot of food sticking problems caused by not having a non-stick interior.

2.) Use a lower heat setting

You’ll find that you don’t need to use as much heat as your used to, when you cook with Cuisinart stainless steel cookware. Due to how the pots are constructed, they tend to heat up very quickly. Start with a lower temperature than you think you’ll need and gradually increase your temperature until you get used to how the pans heat up.

3.) Prevent food sticking

There are few things you can do (besides seasoning) that can help prevent food from sticking to your pans. First, always make sure that your oil is hot before adding any food. You’ll want to preheat your pan, then add the oil and allow that to heat up, and only then should you add your food.

Don’t try put too much food in the pot at one time. If necessary, cook up smaller batches of food.

What if you get burnt on or stuck on food? Try some vinegar and baking soda to scrub away tough food spots. Another trick is to use a product called Barkeeper’s Helper, or a cleaner specifically made for stainless steel cookware.

By following these tips for how to cook with Cuisinart stainless steel cookware, you’ll not only enjoy cooking more, but you’ll also be ensuring that your pots and pans will last for a long time.



Source by Emily A. Johnson

Is It Safe to Use Scratched Stainless Steel Cookware?

Stainless steel cookware is considered a good choice of cookware for the kitchen. It is the most popular cookware in North America. It is heavy-duty, durable, corrosive resistant and easy to maintain. However, it does get scratched if not being used and cared for properly which makes we wonder if it is safe using scratched stainless steel cookware.

Stainless steel cookware is made of iron, chromium and nickel. When abrasive materials are used on stainless pot or pan, the pot or pan might get scratched eventually. When cooking with a scratched stainless pot or pan, a small amount of iron, chromium and nickel will be released to the foods. Consuming a large amount of iron can cause excessive levels of iron in our blood which can be danger and at risk. The dietary reference intake lists the tolerable intake iron level for adults as 45 mg per day. The tolerable intake iron level for children under fourteen years old is 40 mg per day. The daily chromium intake in the United States is 35 mg for adult male and 25 mg for adult female. Cooking with nickel containing in stainless cookware will not add a significant amount of nickel to the everyday meal. However, sensitive individuals may show allergic reaction to nickel.

Studies have shown that using light scratched stainless cookware does not pose any significant risk to health concerns. It is said that the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking with the scratched pot or pan is less than the percentage of total daily intake. Nevertheless, if stainless pot or pan is severely damaged with deep scratches or shown signs of corrosion, it is recommended the pot or pan should be discarded. Severe damaged with deep scratches pots and pans should not be used since it is uncertain of the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking, and therefore might cause significant health concerns. It is also recommended individuals who have allergic reactions to nickel should avoid using nickel containing in stainless steel cookware.

Best of all, it is a good practice to only use soft cloth when cleaning to prevent damaging stainless cookware. To minimize the cause of damages, it is suggested abrasive cleaners are not used when washing, and avoid using sharp and pointy utensils when cooking. Although stainless steel cookware is resilient, without proper care, it can be damaged. When stainless cookware is damaged, it will not be at its best performance. For example, stainless pot or pan with copper-coated bottom can lose its good heat conduction when the copper layer is scratched. Consequently, damages also lessen the pot or pan’s lifetime value and appearance.

In summary, light scratched stainless steel cookware does not pose any risks to health concerns. Using light scratched stainless pot or pan is harmless as only a small amount of iron, chromium and nickel be released when cooking. Consuming a small percentage of iron, chromium and nickel which is less than the percentage of daily intake does not add significant to health issues. However, if the pot or pan is deeply scratched, it is recommended the pot or pan should not be used as the amount of iron, chromium and nickel released when cooking might be poisonous. It is important to properly use and care for stainless steel cookware. In order to keep stainless cookware at its best performance, avoid using abrasive materials when cooking or cleaning stainless pot or pan. By doing so, it certainly will prevent causing damages to the pot or pan and therefore enhance its durability and lifetime.



Source by Mimi Lou