Difference Between T304 and T316 Waterless Stainless Steel Cookware

When shopping for waterless cookware, it is important to determine your priorities. What cookware pieces are you most likely to use? What type of steam control mechanism would you like-steam valve or thermo control knob? To be classified as waterless cookware, the cookware must be at least 5 ply (layers), have some type of steam-control valve and have a flat, encapsulated bottom that contains the metal layers enclosed in stainless steel. Waterless cookware is typically sold on the Internet, home parties, or state and county fairs. The cookware sold in department store environments is generally 3-ply. Waterless cookware because of its composition and construction is more expensive than conventional cookware. However, even within the waterless cookware market, there is quite a price range between competitors. Most waterless cookware is T304 surgical stainless steel. T304 cookware has the following advantages including corrosion resistance, temperature resistance, flavor protection, and ease in cleaning. With proper care and maintenance, this cookware will keep its shine and beauty for a lifetime. Recently, a few companies have started to use T316 in their cookware. While there are some distinct differences between the two, the visible eye cannot detect any difference between the two. Further, there is not a distinguishable difference in taste either. What then is the actual difference between the two grades of stainless steel?

Type 304 contains 20% chromium or more and 10% nickel, comed with 0.08% carbon. It is used for chemical processing equipment, for food, dairy and beverage industries, for heat exchangers, and for milder chemicals. In the cookware industry, the 304 steel is most often used in the manufacturing process. T304 has the ability to withstand the corrosive action of various acids found in fruits, meats, milk, and vegetables. Therefore, it is often used for sinks, tabletops, coffee urns, stoves, refrigerators, milk and cream dispensers and steam tables.

Type 316 contains 16% to 18% chromium and 11% to 14% nickel. Type 316 also contains 2% molybdenum. The molybdenum is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts.) Type 316 is the main stainless steel used in the marine environment, with the exception of screws, bolts, nuts, and other fasteners where strength and wear resistance are necessary. Then Type 304 is typically used.

Do the differences specified above justify spending over $3000 for Saladmaster that now uses 316 stainless steel? Saladmaster offers a great product but many people simply cannot afford such an investment in cookware. When comparing the two grades, the differences are negligible. When exposed to harsh sea salt conditions 24 hours a day for 7 days a week, T316 would last longer under those conditions. If exposed to high concentrations of sodium chloride, T316 is definitely preferable. Therefore, if you are were to put one cup of sodium chloride (table salt) into 4 ounces of water on a daily basis, you would benefit from using the 316 stainless steel over the 304.

If you are considering the purchase of this cookware, two of your primary questions should be: (1) Which cookware set offers the pieces that I would most likely use? (2) What type of steam control valve would I prefer-the steam-control value that has an open/shut lever or the Thermo-control value that has a color-coded dial that visibly shows the cooking temperature.

Waterless cookware is a lifetime investment. While T316 cookware might be the best option for marine use, the majority of cooks can feel comfortable using T304 surgical stainless steel. If you can’t afford several thousand dollars for state-of-the-art cookware, don’t be dismayed. You can still buy quality waterless cookware at a fraction of that cost.. Check out our site-The Gourmets Cookware for some great deals on waterless cookware. In addition, we offer tips for cooking with waterless cookware, cleaning your stainless steel cookware, and great recipes to try with your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware – A Lifetime of Value

Over a million synthetic pots and pans are tossed in landfills every year. These nonstick wonders don’t seem to last very long, 3 to 5 years is common. If you’re re-investing in new cookware, consider replacing your Teflon with a far more cost-effective solution. Consider the value of Stainless Steel Waterless cookware.

The Investment

Comparably priced nonstick stainless steel waterless cookware (between $150 and $250) will save some serious coin over the years. These quality pots and pans are warranted to last for your lifetime.

The Bargain

Durability is a good measure of value. If cookware doesn’t last, it’s no bargain. Too, it’s best to cook on a nonstick surface free of toxicity. Teflon fuming, peeling and erosion represent a serious health hazard as does leaching from soft metal cooking surfaces like copper, aluminum, cast iron and others.

Stainless steel waterless utensils confidently provide the ideal nonstick cooking surface free of toxic risk or continuous ‘seasoning’ to manage rust, “…the closest thing we have to the ideal chemically inert but thermally responsive pan” says Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen: Scribner 2004, page 791. (Search ‘Waterless Cookware: Hype or the Real Thing’ for more on McGee).

The Bonus

Imagine the value of having a lifetime to explore and enjoy the most hygienic, responsive, food-friendly, cook-friendly, earth-friendly and health-friendly set of pots and pans you can own. Yes, ‘friendly’ because cooks, food and cookware are best served when engaged in a supportive relationship, one of consistent service and celebration, learning and triumph.

Included in this friendship are family, friends and another very important member to be invited, seated and served at the dining table, one of robust taste and aroma, of natural nutrients and energy, of wholesome vitality and healing health. There’s no substitute for nature’s honest foods, no ‘fortified’ material worthy of the name ‘whole food’ (search ‘waterless cookware, the healthy choice‘).

The Value

It’s no secret that much of today’s food has evolved for the sake of convenience and not nutrition. The composition and function of modern cookware has evolved as well, and not for the better. For example, synthetic or ceramic coatings on the inside and colorful enameled coatings on the outside don’t reflect cookware value, good health or good sense. Coatings are cosmetic at best, ‘cover-ups’ applied to lesser grades of steel used in fabrication. Look below the skin for a lifetime of value.

Let’s revisit the purpose of food (and the cookware that cooks it) to more fully appreciate the value of quality stainless steel waterless cookware:

Cooking is actually a moment of truth, a culmination of nature’s food cycle, a moment when the vital cache of earth’s nutrient goodness is tastefully enhanced or sadly wasted. A pot or pan is more than an appliance to heat processed food material or boil away nature’s precious minerals, vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. Real food deserves better. There’s simply more to the enriching soils of organic vegetables and free-range meats, more to engage the palate, the nose, the eyes, more to savor and certainly more to revitalize and re-energize. We are, after all, only as healthy as the health of that which we eat. To that end, pots and pans are a huge contributor to the nutritional and savory fate of foods. Much can be gained or lost in the simple act of cooking.

Stainless steel waterless cookware honors and retains the goodness of nature’s honest efforts. As with good friends or marriage or other maturing relationships, a partnership with food and cooking takes time to appreciate and thrive. It helps to have cookware that’s reliable, steady, dependable, trusted, capable of ideal cooking conditions simply and easily mastered. Cooking is life long. We might as well mature a friendship with cookware durable and worthy enough to nurture and sustain this kind of relationship.

The Return on Investment

Your grandma likely used similar pots and pans way back when. Stainless Steel cookware isn’t new, but grandma’s originals lacked many of today’s Waterless features:

– Multi-ply stainless steel fabrication, 5-, 7-, or 9-ply 18/10 chromium/nickel construction for quality

– Capsulated heat-conductive elements (copper, aluminum, etc.) for unparalleled low-heat cooking

– Steam Control covers to fully preserve and retain nutritious vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants

– Thermally responsive, efficient utensils to cook faster, safer, more evenly and economically

These and many other improvements now render today’s waterless utensil capable of cooking food the way it was meant to be cooked, the way Mother Nature intended her vegetables and meats to be served, fully appreciated, fully valued, fully themselves. To serve anything less isn’t a bargain, it’s a wasted opportunity for all concerned, especially food.

When real food is experienced (cooked as Mother Nature intended), one tends to develop an honest taste and firm loyalty. My acquired personal preference of 30 years as family cook, and my business specialty, is Stainless Steel Waterless pots and pans. Being in the business I’m confident I speak for others in this specialty when I share this fact: not a day goes by without hearing from folks looking to replace a pot handle or lid knob on their cookware. These little attachments, durable as they are, eventually wear out. Here’s a sample of today’s customer requests from ChoiceCookery’s on-line Contact Us page:

“I have a set of Flavor-Seal by Cory cookware that I bought in 1963. I need to replace the handles on the large fry pan. Are they available?”

“My mom has a set of Miracle Maid pans she got when she was married. She loves them, but the electric fry pan has a short in the cord and we would like to get a new cord. Can you help us?”

“I need to replace the vented knobs on my Royal Queen waterless cookware. I have had it for 27 years and I love it but over time the knobs have begun to lose their ability to seal the moisture in. Could you give me information about how to order? Thank you in advance.”

“I can’t find Nutri-Seal anywhere. Can you help me? I need a new handle on my 8qt stock pot.”

“I’d like to order a vent knob for my set, Maxam KT17. It has been thirty years since I brought them home, lots of cooking mishaps along the way and the handle on my roaster finally broke. Please call me.”

We called. And yes, all these cooks were relieved to know replacements are still available.

1) Trust a brand that’s here to stay. Maxam, the brand we represent, has been innovating and manufacturing stainless steel waterless cookware for over 60 years.

2) For businesses like ours, there’s a beautiful irony here. Unlike disposable bargain cookware, our pots and pans last a lifetime. Our customers return of course, usually to purchase a set of cookware for their grown children or a grandchild’s wedding, maybe a handle or knob for themselves (a $12 replacement easily attached, adding another 30 years of cookware service and value). These folks tend to share the good news with family and friends. Too, they’re experiencing a cookware partnership they are not about to give up! Loyalty is honestly earned and yes, priceless.

The Bottom Line

Look beyond 3-to-5 years. Invest in cookware that matures your relationship with food and cooking. For me, it’s about two hats I wear and a bond that ties them together, a hat I experience everyday as family cook and a friendship with customers embracing the simple joys and lifelong value of waterless pots and pans.

Your friendship with food and cooking simply can’t be explored, experienced and enjoyed using cookware less capable than stainless steel waterless pots and pans. Bargain prices and cosmetic glitz just can’t appreciate in value. Consider cookware you’ll never have to (or want to) replace. Real value keeps giving for your lifetime, but that’s just our warranty. Cook healthy, eat honestly, and thrive.



Source by Steve Denning

Cooking Vegetables With Waterless Cookware – Part 2

Cooking vegetables correctly does not have to be a guessing situation. By following a few simple directions, you can insure that your fresh or frozen vegetables will turn out tasty, appealing and cooked to perfection every time.

Cooking Fresh Vegetables

To cook fresh vegetables, place the vegetables in a pan that is almost completely full once vegetables are inserted. When cooking with waterless cookware, cooking vegetables in too large a pan for the quantity you are cooking can be a problem. Then rinse your vegetables with cold water and pour the excess water off. The water that clings to the vegetables plus the vegetable’s own natural moisture will provide enough moisture for cooking the waterless way.

Cover the pan, close the vent and cook over medium-low heat. When the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal has formed. Cook according to the time chart that follows: Do not peek. Doing so not only lengthens the cooking time but also increases the risk of burning your vegetables because the vapor seal is broken. When finished cooking, test for doneness with a fork.  If not done, cover the pan, close the vent and add 2 to 3 Tbsp. of water to the rim to reestablish the vapor seal. Cook over low heat for 5 to 10 minutes.

Cooking Frozen Vegetables

Do not defrost the vegetables. Again the size of pan used for cooking the vegetables is important. Once the vegetables have been placed in the pan, your pan should be almost completely full. Rinse your vegetables with cold water and pour the excess water off. The water that clings to the vegetables plus its own natural moisture will provide enough moisture for cooking.

Cover the pan, close the vent and cook over medium-low heat. When the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal has formed. Cook according to the time chart. Do not peek. Removing the cover will destroy the vapor seal, lengthen the cooking time, and possibly cause the vegetables to burn.

Cooking Times for Vegetables:

Artichokes (whole) (30 to 45)

Artichoke hearts (10 to 15)

Asparagus (10 to 15)

Beans, green (fresh, cut) (15 to 20)

Beans, green (fresh, French cut) (10 to 15)

Beans, green (frozen) (10 to 12)

Beans, Lima (fresh) (30 to 35)

Beans, Lima (frozen) (10 to 12)

Beets (whole) (35 to 40)

Broccoli (15 to 20)

Brussels Sprouts (15 to 20)

Cabbage, shredded (10 to 15)

Carrots, sliced (15 to 20)

Cauliflower (10 to 15)

Corn (fresh) (15 to 20)

Corn (frozen) (10 to 12)

Eggplant (5 to 8)

Greens (10 to 12)

Leeks (12 to 15)

Mushrooms (5 to 10)

Okra (15 to 20)

Onions (whole) (15 to 20)

Parsnips (sliced) (15 to 20)

Peas (frozen) (5 to 7)

Potatoes (quartered) (20 to 25)

Potatoes (whole) (30 to 35)

Potatoes, sweet (30 to 35)

Spinach (frozen) (8 to 10)

Spinach (fresh) (15 to 20)

Squash, summer (yellow) 15 to 20)

Squash, winter (25 to 30)

Squash, zucchini (20 to 25)

Tomatoes (10 to 15)

Turnips and rutabagas (25 to 30)

*Cooking times reflect the time after the vapor seal is formed, which usually takes 3 to 5 minutes. Note: To keep your vegetables hot and ready to serve, keep the cover on and the vent closed. The vegetables will stay hot in the pan for about 20 to 25 minutes.

Don’t let the concept of cooking waterless scare you. When you try it, you will soon discover how easy it is to actually use waterless cookware if you follow the above principles. Yes, cooking with waterless cookware is healthy because vegetables cook in their own natural juices, but you will soon discover how tasty and uniquely flavorful your prepared meals actually are. The Gourmets Cookware offers a wide variety of quality waterless stainless steel products along with tips and healthy recipes that can be easily adapted to your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Difference Between T304 and T316 Waterless Stainless Steel Cookware

When shopping for waterless cookware, it is important to determine your priorities. What cookware pieces are you most likely to use? What type of steam control mechanism would you like-steam valve or thermo control knob? To be classified as waterless cookware, the cookware must be at least 5 ply (layers), have some type of steam-control valve and have a flat, encapsulated bottom that contains the metal layers enclosed in stainless steel. Waterless cookware is typically sold on the Internet, home parties, or state and county fairs. The cookware sold in department store environments is generally 3-ply. Waterless cookware because of its composition and construction is more expensive than conventional cookware. However, even within the waterless cookware market, there is quite a price range between competitors. Most waterless cookware is T304 surgical stainless steel. T304 cookware has the following advantages including corrosion resistance, temperature resistance, flavor protection, and ease in cleaning. With proper care and maintenance, this cookware will keep its shine and beauty for a lifetime. Recently, a few companies have started to use T316 in their cookware. While there are some distinct differences between the two, the visible eye cannot detect any difference between the two. Further, there is not a distinguishable difference in taste either. What then is the actual difference between the two grades of stainless steel?

Type 304 contains 20% chromium or more and 10% nickel, comed with 0.08% carbon. It is used for chemical processing equipment, for food, dairy and beverage industries, for heat exchangers, and for milder chemicals. In the cookware industry, the 304 steel is most often used in the manufacturing process. T304 has the ability to withstand the corrosive action of various acids found in fruits, meats, milk, and vegetables. Therefore, it is often used for sinks, tabletops, coffee urns, stoves, refrigerators, milk and cream dispensers and steam tables.

Type 316 contains 16% to 18% chromium and 11% to 14% nickel. Type 316 also contains 2% molybdenum. The molybdenum is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts.) Type 316 is the main stainless steel used in the marine environment, with the exception of screws, bolts, nuts, and other fasteners where strength and wear resistance are necessary. Then Type 304 is typically used.

Do the differences specified above justify spending over $3000 for Saladmaster that now uses 316 stainless steel? Saladmaster offers a great product but many people simply cannot afford such an investment in cookware. When comparing the two grades, the differences are negligible. When exposed to harsh sea salt conditions 24 hours a day for 7 days a week, T316 would last longer under those conditions. If exposed to high concentrations of sodium chloride, T316 is definitely preferable. Therefore, if you are were to put one cup of sodium chloride (table salt) into 4 ounces of water on a daily basis, you would benefit from using the 316 stainless steel over the 304.

If you are considering the purchase of this cookware, two of your primary questions should be: (1) Which cookware set offers the pieces that I would most likely use? (2) What type of steam control valve would I prefer-the steam-control value that has an open/shut lever or the Thermo-control value that has a color-coded dial that visibly shows the cooking temperature.

Waterless cookware is a lifetime investment. While T316 cookware might be the best option for marine use, the majority of cooks can feel comfortable using T304 surgical stainless steel. If you can’t afford several thousand dollars for state-of-the-art cookware, don’t be dismayed. You can still buy quality waterless cookware at a fraction of that cost.. Check out our site-The Gourmets Cookware for some great deals on waterless cookware. In addition, we offer tips for cooking with waterless cookware, cleaning your stainless steel cookware, and great recipes to try with your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware – A Lifetime of Value

Over a million synthetic pots and pans are tossed in landfills every year. These nonstick wonders don’t seem to last very long, 3 to 5 years is common. If you’re re-investing in new cookware, consider replacing your Teflon with a far more cost-effective solution. Consider the value of Stainless Steel Waterless cookware.

The Investment

Comparably priced nonstick stainless steel waterless cookware (between $150 and $250) will save some serious coin over the years. These quality pots and pans are warranted to last for your lifetime.

The Bargain

Durability is a good measure of value. If cookware doesn’t last, it’s no bargain. Too, it’s best to cook on a nonstick surface free of toxicity. Teflon fuming, peeling and erosion represent a serious health hazard as does leaching from soft metal cooking surfaces like copper, aluminum, cast iron and others.

Stainless steel waterless utensils confidently provide the ideal nonstick cooking surface free of toxic risk or continuous ‘seasoning’ to manage rust, “…the closest thing we have to the ideal chemically inert but thermally responsive pan” says Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking: the Science and Lore of the Kitchen: Scribner 2004, page 791. (Search ‘Waterless Cookware: Hype or the Real Thing’ for more on McGee).

The Bonus

Imagine the value of having a lifetime to explore and enjoy the most hygienic, responsive, food-friendly, cook-friendly, earth-friendly and health-friendly set of pots and pans you can own. Yes, ‘friendly’ because cooks, food and cookware are best served when engaged in a supportive relationship, one of consistent service and celebration, learning and triumph.

Included in this friendship are family, friends and another very important member to be invited, seated and served at the dining table, one of robust taste and aroma, of natural nutrients and energy, of wholesome vitality and healing health. There’s no substitute for nature’s honest foods, no ‘fortified’ material worthy of the name ‘whole food’ (search ‘waterless cookware, the healthy choice‘).

The Value

It’s no secret that much of today’s food has evolved for the sake of convenience and not nutrition. The composition and function of modern cookware has evolved as well, and not for the better. For example, synthetic or ceramic coatings on the inside and colorful enameled coatings on the outside don’t reflect cookware value, good health or good sense. Coatings are cosmetic at best, ‘cover-ups’ applied to lesser grades of steel used in fabrication. Look below the skin for a lifetime of value.

Let’s revisit the purpose of food (and the cookware that cooks it) to more fully appreciate the value of quality stainless steel waterless cookware:

Cooking is actually a moment of truth, a culmination of nature’s food cycle, a moment when the vital cache of earth’s nutrient goodness is tastefully enhanced or sadly wasted. A pot or pan is more than an appliance to heat processed food material or boil away nature’s precious minerals, vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. Real food deserves better. There’s simply more to the enriching soils of organic vegetables and free-range meats, more to engage the palate, the nose, the eyes, more to savor and certainly more to revitalize and re-energize. We are, after all, only as healthy as the health of that which we eat. To that end, pots and pans are a huge contributor to the nutritional and savory fate of foods. Much can be gained or lost in the simple act of cooking.

Stainless steel waterless cookware honors and retains the goodness of nature’s honest efforts. As with good friends or marriage or other maturing relationships, a partnership with food and cooking takes time to appreciate and thrive. It helps to have cookware that’s reliable, steady, dependable, trusted, capable of ideal cooking conditions simply and easily mastered. Cooking is life long. We might as well mature a friendship with cookware durable and worthy enough to nurture and sustain this kind of relationship.

The Return on Investment

Your grandma likely used similar pots and pans way back when. Stainless Steel cookware isn’t new, but grandma’s originals lacked many of today’s Waterless features:

– Multi-ply stainless steel fabrication, 5-, 7-, or 9-ply 18/10 chromium/nickel construction for quality

– Capsulated heat-conductive elements (copper, aluminum, etc.) for unparalleled low-heat cooking

– Steam Control covers to fully preserve and retain nutritious vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants

– Thermally responsive, efficient utensils to cook faster, safer, more evenly and economically

These and many other improvements now render today’s waterless utensil capable of cooking food the way it was meant to be cooked, the way Mother Nature intended her vegetables and meats to be served, fully appreciated, fully valued, fully themselves. To serve anything less isn’t a bargain, it’s a wasted opportunity for all concerned, especially food.

When real food is experienced (cooked as Mother Nature intended), one tends to develop an honest taste and firm loyalty. My acquired personal preference of 30 years as family cook, and my business specialty, is Stainless Steel Waterless pots and pans. Being in the business I’m confident I speak for others in this specialty when I share this fact: not a day goes by without hearing from folks looking to replace a pot handle or lid knob on their cookware. These little attachments, durable as they are, eventually wear out. Here’s a sample of today’s customer requests from ChoiceCookery’s on-line Contact Us page:

“I have a set of Flavor-Seal by Cory cookware that I bought in 1963. I need to replace the handles on the large fry pan. Are they available?”

“My mom has a set of Miracle Maid pans she got when she was married. She loves them, but the electric fry pan has a short in the cord and we would like to get a new cord. Can you help us?”

“I need to replace the vented knobs on my Royal Queen waterless cookware. I have had it for 27 years and I love it but over time the knobs have begun to lose their ability to seal the moisture in. Could you give me information about how to order? Thank you in advance.”

“I can’t find Nutri-Seal anywhere. Can you help me? I need a new handle on my 8qt stock pot.”

“I’d like to order a vent knob for my set, Maxam KT17. It has been thirty years since I brought them home, lots of cooking mishaps along the way and the handle on my roaster finally broke. Please call me.”

We called. And yes, all these cooks were relieved to know replacements are still available.

1) Trust a brand that’s here to stay. Maxam, the brand we represent, has been innovating and manufacturing stainless steel waterless cookware for over 60 years.

2) For businesses like ours, there’s a beautiful irony here. Unlike disposable bargain cookware, our pots and pans last a lifetime. Our customers return of course, usually to purchase a set of cookware for their grown children or a grandchild’s wedding, maybe a handle or knob for themselves (a $12 replacement easily attached, adding another 30 years of cookware service and value). These folks tend to share the good news with family and friends. Too, they’re experiencing a cookware partnership they are not about to give up! Loyalty is honestly earned and yes, priceless.

The Bottom Line

Look beyond 3-to-5 years. Invest in cookware that matures your relationship with food and cooking. For me, it’s about two hats I wear and a bond that ties them together, a hat I experience everyday as family cook and a friendship with customers embracing the simple joys and lifelong value of waterless pots and pans.

Your friendship with food and cooking simply can’t be explored, experienced and enjoyed using cookware less capable than stainless steel waterless pots and pans. Bargain prices and cosmetic glitz just can’t appreciate in value. Consider cookware you’ll never have to (or want to) replace. Real value keeps giving for your lifetime, but that’s just our warranty. Cook healthy, eat honestly, and thrive.



Source by Steve Denning

Cooking Vegetables With Waterless Cookware – Part 2

Cooking vegetables correctly does not have to be a guessing situation. By following a few simple directions, you can insure that your fresh or frozen vegetables will turn out tasty, appealing and cooked to perfection every time.

Cooking Fresh Vegetables

To cook fresh vegetables, place the vegetables in a pan that is almost completely full once vegetables are inserted. When cooking with waterless cookware, cooking vegetables in too large a pan for the quantity you are cooking can be a problem. Then rinse your vegetables with cold water and pour the excess water off. The water that clings to the vegetables plus the vegetable’s own natural moisture will provide enough moisture for cooking the waterless way.

Cover the pan, close the vent and cook over medium-low heat. When the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal has formed. Cook according to the time chart that follows: Do not peek. Doing so not only lengthens the cooking time but also increases the risk of burning your vegetables because the vapor seal is broken. When finished cooking, test for doneness with a fork.  If not done, cover the pan, close the vent and add 2 to 3 Tbsp. of water to the rim to reestablish the vapor seal. Cook over low heat for 5 to 10 minutes.

Cooking Frozen Vegetables

Do not defrost the vegetables. Again the size of pan used for cooking the vegetables is important. Once the vegetables have been placed in the pan, your pan should be almost completely full. Rinse your vegetables with cold water and pour the excess water off. The water that clings to the vegetables plus its own natural moisture will provide enough moisture for cooking.

Cover the pan, close the vent and cook over medium-low heat. When the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal has formed. Cook according to the time chart. Do not peek. Removing the cover will destroy the vapor seal, lengthen the cooking time, and possibly cause the vegetables to burn.

Cooking Times for Vegetables:

Artichokes (whole) (30 to 45)

Artichoke hearts (10 to 15)

Asparagus (10 to 15)

Beans, green (fresh, cut) (15 to 20)

Beans, green (fresh, French cut) (10 to 15)

Beans, green (frozen) (10 to 12)

Beans, Lima (fresh) (30 to 35)

Beans, Lima (frozen) (10 to 12)

Beets (whole) (35 to 40)

Broccoli (15 to 20)

Brussels Sprouts (15 to 20)

Cabbage, shredded (10 to 15)

Carrots, sliced (15 to 20)

Cauliflower (10 to 15)

Corn (fresh) (15 to 20)

Corn (frozen) (10 to 12)

Eggplant (5 to 8)

Greens (10 to 12)

Leeks (12 to 15)

Mushrooms (5 to 10)

Okra (15 to 20)

Onions (whole) (15 to 20)

Parsnips (sliced) (15 to 20)

Peas (frozen) (5 to 7)

Potatoes (quartered) (20 to 25)

Potatoes (whole) (30 to 35)

Potatoes, sweet (30 to 35)

Spinach (frozen) (8 to 10)

Spinach (fresh) (15 to 20)

Squash, summer (yellow) 15 to 20)

Squash, winter (25 to 30)

Squash, zucchini (20 to 25)

Tomatoes (10 to 15)

Turnips and rutabagas (25 to 30)

*Cooking times reflect the time after the vapor seal is formed, which usually takes 3 to 5 minutes. Note: To keep your vegetables hot and ready to serve, keep the cover on and the vent closed. The vegetables will stay hot in the pan for about 20 to 25 minutes.

Don’t let the concept of cooking waterless scare you. When you try it, you will soon discover how easy it is to actually use waterless cookware if you follow the above principles. Yes, cooking with waterless cookware is healthy because vegetables cook in their own natural juices, but you will soon discover how tasty and uniquely flavorful your prepared meals actually are. The Gourmets Cookware offers a wide variety of quality waterless stainless steel products along with tips and healthy recipes that can be easily adapted to your waterless cookware.



Source by Marcia Klun

Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware – The Secret To Good Health

Surgical stainless steel waterless cookware is fast replacing traditional cookware made of Teflon, aluminum, glass porcelain, light stainless-steel and iron, as they have been identified through scientific research as a more salubrious and efficacious cooking medium than their substitutes. The difference between surgical stainless steel and ordinary light steel is that the former contains nickel and chromium unlike the latter.

A joint research study for evaluating waterless cookware, conducted by the Bradley University home-science student- faculty team showed that high quality Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware produced cooking results with higher rated tastes and lesser percentage contraction losses than non-stick pans used on electric-stove-tops. This cookware also was found to be the best option for cooking on induction stove-tops.

Types

There are two varieties of surgical stainless steel used to make waterless cookware- the 304 and 316 versions. The main aspect that distinguishes the two is that 316-variety has a higher amount of chromium and Nickel than 304-version; it also has an extra component- Molybdenum-2-3%. Theses additional features make 316 surgical steel able to withstand corrosion caused by Sodium Chloride. Therefore, if you reside near coastal areas with high exposure to sea salt by waterless cookware made of 316 surgical stainless stains for utensil durability. However this cookware will be costlier than those made of 304 surgical steel.

Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware could be non-vacuum, meaning it cooks food with steam at 100 degrees Celsius; The vacuum variety incorporates a steam control valve mechanism on the utensil lid so as to make cooking possible using a partial- vacuum vapor seal. This cookware helps the foods to cook by the steam they let off and by the water they were rinsed with. However, you will have to add 1/8 inch of water to meet basic steam requirements. There are 5 Ply and 7 Ply variants for use on various cooking stoves.

Features and Advantages

Both 304 and 316 ranges possess a high tensile strength of 84-185 ksi and yield strength of 42-140 ksi making them strong and durable.

This kitchenware tends to save cooking time and creates cooking fuel economies through uniform heat distribution from the heat source. This cookware cooks faster than a pressure cooker, which also involves steam cooking, because it does not require steam build-up within the vessel to cook food. Hence, it does not heating to the temperature required to boil water in a pressure-cooker.

In vacuum versions when you lower the heat as steam escapes through the valve during cooking, the firm vapor seal, a ringlet of water that develops between the lid and the pot, enables food to cook fast.

The dishes concocted in these vessels retain their nutrition, fiber and vitamin content, enzymes and juices even after cooking. In comparison to other cookware, they use 25% less heat and complete the cooking process in half the normal cooking time.

Steam cooking in this cookware eliminates the need to use oil for cooking thus saving you from obesity, cholesterol and heart diseases.

It is healthy as surgical stainless steel is impermeable in nature and prevents toxic heavy metals from leaching into the food from the vessel.

Surgical stainless steel possesses a tremendous stain resistant property. Burnt spots can be removed just by boiling water in the pot and light stains can be cleaned with cleaners and paper towel wipes.

Costs

Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware is available at reasonable prices in the USA. A complete set can be bought for approximately $500-1000. Since any type of kitchen tools can be used with this sturdy cookware, you don’t need to spend extra on special accessories for use in conjunction with the basic set. The manufacturers offer a lifetime warranty on their products.

Tips

Buy Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware that is heavy, as the weight implies the steel is of premium quality. Choose utensils with thicker bottoms that evenly cook the food throughout the pot through uniform distribution of heat. Thick bottoms also preserve warmth of the food longer after cooking is over.

To quicken cooking times, don’t lift the lid during the cooking process while preparing food using this cookware to prevent the inner steam and heat from being lost.

When the steam is released through the valve during cooking instead of waiting for the whistle to blow, lower the flame heat intensity. This will also have the effect of conserving energy.

Using soft, non-abrasive cleaning materials will help enhance durability and sustain the gleam of this cookware for longer durations.

If you utilize an induction stove in your kitchen look out for the 7 Ply Surgical Stainless Steel Waterless Cookware that has a carbon steel layer sandwiched between the surgical stainless steel layers for better heat distribution and cooking results.



Source by Peter A Cerrato